Abuse survivor urges politicians to introduce child protection measures

Abuse survivor urges politicians to introduce child protection measures

A survivor whose voice will be one of the last to be heard in the child abuse royal commission has urged political leaders to cast aside religious loyalties and urgently introduce strong child protection measures.

On Friday, the public hearings of the royal commission into institutional responses to child sexual abuse will come to an end.

 

Over the past four years, the commission has revealed the disturbing extent of child abuse in religious and secular institutions across the country. 

It has repeatedly uncovered far-reaching cover-ups of child sexual abuse, and shown how institutions have ostracised survivors and actively worked to undermine them.

The commission held more than 8,000 private sessions with survivors, 64% of whom were male, and 46% between 10 and 14 years old at the time they were abused. Five per cent of survivors were abused when they were under the age of five. 

Perpetrators were overwhelmingly men, and most commonly members of the religious clergy (32%), teachers (21%) and residential care workers (13%).

The royal commission has already made a series of clear and unequivocal recommendations to federal and state governments. 

Commissioners have urged for the creation of a national scheme of redress, a uniform and integrated working with children check system, mandatory reporting, and consistent child protection standards. 

But state governments, including South Australia, have failed to act

On Friday, the royal commission will give the last word to a group of six survivors, including Damian De Marco. 

De Marco survived abuse in the Marist Brothers Catholic order, where abuse and cover-ups were rife.

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  • commented 2017-03-31 05:02:29 -0500
    When will the whole commission end it’s work and tell the final verdict?