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The Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests

SNAP Press Statement

For immediate release: Monday, March 8, 2010

Victims group slams Pope’s brother

Statement by David Clohessy of St. Louis, national director of SNAP, the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (314 566 9790 cell, 314 645 5915 home)

Within days of the first clergy sex abuse victims coming forward in Germany, the Pope’s brother attacks them. Shame on him.

Deeply wounded victims of horrific child sex crimes should be helped, not assailed. Those who report clergy sex crimes should be praised, not vilified.

Church officials should bind up the wounds of those in pain, not rub more salt into them by attributing ill motives to well-intentioned, hurting individuals. Having never met the brave victims who are speaking up, Ratzinger has no business claiming to know, and attacking, their motives.

Mean-spirited and self-pitying remarks like this – that try to portray the church as being victimized – serve only to discourage others who saw, suspected or suffered devastating abuse and cover ups from speaking up, exposing predators, protecting kids and healing themselves.

The Pope himself should condemn his brother’s harsh and intimidating comments.

(SNAP, the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, is the nation’s oldest and largest support group for clergy abuse victims. We’ve been around for 22 years and have more than 9,000 members across the country. Despite the word “priest” in our title, we have members who were molested by religious figures of all denominations, including nuns, rabbis, bishops, and Protestant ministers. Our website is SNAPnetwork.org)

Contact David Clohessy (314-566-9790 cell, 314-645-5915 home), Peter Isely (414-429-7259) Barbara Blaine (312-399-4747), Barbara Dorris (314-503-0003)


http://www.thelocal.de/politics/20100308-25727.html

Pope's brother oblivious to choir sexual abuse
8 Mar 10 14:24 CET - http://www.thelocal.de/national/20100308-25727.html

Pope Benedict XVI's brother told an Italian newspaper over the weekend he was never aware of sexual abuse in the famous boys choir in Regensburg that he headed for nearly three decades." I never knew anything," Georg Ratzinger told Italian newspaper La Repubblica. "The incidents that are being talked about go back 50 or 60 years to the 1950s. It was another generation than when I was there."

"It's also another generation than (the one) that currently leads the foundation and the choir," he added.

The director and composer Franz Wittenbrink, a former pupil of the boarding school attached to the Domspatzen (Cathedral Sparrows) choir, has spoken of an "ingenious system of sadistic punishments connected to sexual pleasure" at the school.

In comments published in Monday's edition of Der Spiegel news weekly, he accused a former head of the school of "taking two or three boys into his room in the evenings," giving them wine and masturbating with them.

Wittenbrink told the magazine it was well known what went on at the school, and he "could not understand how the pope's brother Georg Ratzinger, who was master of the chapel from 1964, could not have been aware."

The Domspatzen allegations are part of a widening sex scandal rocking Germany's Roman Catholic Church, which includes allegations of abuse at a number of institutions, including a monastic school in the southern town of Ettal.

Asked about the impact of the scandals, Ratzinger, who is a bishop, voiced concern about a "certain animosity towards the Church" as well as feelings of "resentment and hostility."

"It seems to me that behind these affirmations there is clear intention to speak against the Church," he said in reference to the string of recent revelations in the German press. He told the newspaper that he was "entirely ready" to appear before a court if authorities considered it necessary.

According to La Repubblica and other media, Ratzinger spoke about the scandal with his brother, Pope Benedict XVI, during a recent visit to Rome.

Meanwhile Justice Minister Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger said that a "wall of silence" was particularly prevalent at Catholic-run schools because of a 2001 Church directive that cases of abuse be "subject to papal confidentiality."

This meant that allegations of abuse "were not supposed to go outside the Church but instead were meant to be investigated internally," the minister told Deutschlandfunk radio.

Stephan Ackermann, the bishop of Trier, who has been put in charge of investigating abuse by the German Catholic Bishops’ Conference, rejected this, saying that common Church practice was for state authorities to investigate.

None of the priests concerned is expected to face criminal charges because the alleged crimes took place too long ago. At present cases can only be pursued for 20 years after a victim turns 18.

But the expanding scandal at Catholic institutions and new revelations about sexual abuse at a progressive boarding school over the weekend sparked calls from German politicians to extend the statute of limitations for such crimes.

Education Minister Annette Schavan from the Christian Democrats called current laws in question on Sunday. Her doubts about the current legal situation were echoed by Ralf Stegner, the leader of the Social Democrats in the state of Schleswig-Holstein.

“It must be possible keep the unreported cases to a minimum and break the decades of silence,” Stegner told daily Hamburger Abendblatt, adding that statute of limitation rules should be reviewed.

Over the weekend, media reports revealed that between 50 and 100 pupils at the progressive Odenwaldschule private boarding school in Hesse were regularly sexually abused. The news follows a series of revelations about abuse in Catholic schools in Germany, many of which have been deemed beyond court jurisdiction because they occurred decades ago.

However Justice Minister Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger rejected the calls for the statute of limitations to be changed or even scrapped altogether in cases of child abuse.

"I don't think this would be a silver bullet," she said.

AFP/DDP/The Local (news@thelocal.de)


German minister hits out at Vatican over abuse
March 08, 2010

BERLIN (AFP) - Germany's justice minister hit out at the Vatican on Monday over a child sex abuse scandal engulfing the country's Roman Catholic Church, including at a choir formerly run by the pope's brother.

Sabine Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger said that a "wall of silence" was particularly prevalent at Catholic-run schools because of a 2001 Church directive that cases of abuse be "subject to papal confidentiality".

This meant that allegations of abuse "were not supposed to go outside the Church but instead were meant to be investigated internally," the minister told Deutschlandfunk radio.

Stephan Ackermann, the bishop of Trier, who has been put in charge of investigating abuse by the German Episcopal Conference, rejected this, saying that common Church practice was for state authorities to investigate.

The German Catholic Church has been rocked in recent weeks by a snowballing scandal over abuse of children at Church-run schools dating back several decades.

Pope Benedict XVI last month called child abuse a "heinous crime" and a "grave sin" as he wrapped up talks with two dozen bishops seeking to limit the damage from a spate of similar scandals, most notably in Ireland.

In Germany the first revelations surfaced in January when an elite Jesuit school in Berlin admitted the systematic sexual abuse of its pupils by two priests in the 1970s and 1980s.

Other Catholic schools have since been implicated as more victims come forward, including a boarding school attached to the Domspatzen, a thousand-year-old choir run by Georg Ratzinger, the German-born pope's brother, between 1964 and 1993.

Meanwhile, a report into alleged past abuse at a monastic school in Ettal, near the Swiss border, said last week that minors "were massively abused over decades, sexually, physically and psychologically" by several monks.

None of the priests concerned is expected to face criminal charges because the alleged crimes took place too long ago. At present cases can only be pursued for 20 years after a victim turns 18.

However Leutheusser-Schnarrenberger rejected calls, including from Education Minister Annette Schavan, for the statute of limitations to be changed or even scrapped altogether in cases of child abuse.

"I don't think this would be a silver bullet," she said. One exception could be a case of alleged "questionable behaviour" by a priest dating back to 1999 that the diocese of Augsburg in Bavaria said on Monday was to be re-opened.

The diocese said in a statement that the priest, given another job with no contact with children after complaints from parents, had to contact prosecutors by the end of the day or the diocese would contact them itself.

The chairman of the German Episcopal Conference, Robert Zollitsch, was due to meet with the pope on March 12 at the Vatican to discuss the cases.


Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests
www.snapnetwork.org